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George Eliot

George Eliot

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In This Books Colletion:
Scenes of Clerical Life. (1858): The Sad Fortunes of the Rev. Amos Barton, Mr. Gilfil’s Love Story, Janet’s Repentance.

Adam Bede. (1859)

The Lifted Veil. (1859)

The Mill on the Floss. (1860)

Silas Marner, the Weaver of Raveloe. (1861)

Romola. (1863)

Brother Jacob. (1864)

Felix Holt, the Radical. (1866)

The Spanish Gypsy. (1868)

Middlemarch. (1871/72)

The Legend of Jubal, and Other Poems. (1874): The Legend of Jubal, Agatha, Armgart, How Lisa Loved the King, A Minor Prophet, Brother and Sister, Stradivarius, A College Breakfast-Party, Two Lovers, Self and Life, “Sweet Endings Come and Go, Love,” The Death of Moses, Arion, “O May I Join the Choir Invisible.”

Daniel Deronda. (1876)

Impressions of Theophrastus Such. (1879)

The Essays: From the Note-Book of an Eccentric, How to Avoid Disappointment, The Wisdom of the Child, A Little Fable with a Great Moral, Hints on Snubbing, Carlyle’s Life of Sterling, Margaret Fuller, Woman in France: Madame de Sablé, Three Months in Weimar, Evangelical Teaching: Dr. Cumming, German Wit: Henry Heine, The Natural History of German Life, Silly Novels by Lady Novelists, George Forster, Worldliness and Other-Worldliness: The Poet Young, The Influence of Rationalism, The Grammar of Ornament, Address to Working Men, by Felix Holt, Leaves from a Note-Book.

Miscellaneous Poems: On Being Called a Saint, Farewell, Sonnet, Question and Answer, “’Mid my Gold-Brown Curls,” “’Mid the Rich Store,” “As Tu Va la Lune se Lever,” In A London Drawing Room, Arms! To Arms!, Ex Oriente Lux, In the South, Will Ladislaw’s Song, Erinna, I Grant you Ample Leave, Mordecai’s Hebrew Verses, Count that Day Lost.

Mary Anne (alternatively Mary Ann or Marian) Evans (22 November 1819 – 22 December 1880), known by her pen name George Eliot, was an English novelist, journalist, and translator and one of the leading writers of the Victorian era. She is the author of seven novels, including Adam Bede (1859), The Mill on the Floss (1860), Silas Marner (1861), Middlemarch (1871–72), and Daniel Deronda (1876), most of them set in provincial England and known for their realism and psychological insight.
She used a male pen name, she said, to ensure her works would be taken seriously. Female authors were published under their own names during Eliot's life, but she wanted to escape the stereotype of women only writing lighthearted romances. An additional factor in her use of a pen name may have been a desire to shield her private life from public scrutiny and to prevent scandals attending her relationship with the married George Henry Lewes, with whom she lived for over 20 years.
Her 1872 work, Middlemarch, has been described as the greatest novel in the English language by Martin Amis and by Julian Barnes.
Mary Anne Evans was the third child of Robert Evans (1773–1849) and Christiana Evans (née Pearson) (1788–1836), the daughter of a local farmer. Mary Anne's name was sometimes shortened to Marian. Her full siblings were Christiana, known as Chrissey (1814–59), Isaac (1816–1890), and twin brothers who survived a few days in March 1821. She also had a half-brother, Robert (1802–64), and half-sister, Fanny (1805–82), from her father's previous marriage to Harriet Poynton (?1780–1809). Robert Evans, of Welsh ancestry, was the manager of the Arbury Hall Estate for the Newdigate family in Warwickshire, and Mary Anne was born on the estate at South Farm. In early 1820 the family moved to a house named Griff, between Nuneaton and Bedworth.
The young Evans was obviously intelligent and a voracious reader. Because she was not considered physically beautiful, and thus not thought to have much chance of marriage, and because of her intelligence, her father invested in an education not often afforded women.

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